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Hearing Loss in the Bedroom [Video Transcript]

in the Bedroom [Video Transcript]

Hi, and today we’re going to talk about hearing loss in the bedroom.

So, something you may or may not know about me, depending on how much of my content you have consumed is that I have hearing loss. I have hearing loss in my lower tones. I also have tinnitus, which is currently going on this [left] ear, fluctuating hearing, and no one knows what’s going on with me. Essentially, the story of my life. But I have learned that it impacts the bedroom activities. Quite a bunch. So I’m going to do a short and snappy video today to tell you about how I kind of combat this, shall we say. How I figure out and adapt to hearing loss in the bedroom.

So, things you need to know. I am kinky. Myself, my partner play with blindfolds and ball gags and restraints from time to time. This impacts, well … this obviously impacts it because if I can’t hear something there’s a ball gag in somewhere it’s just like, “What? What? What? Can’t- can’t hear you.” And that’s not really that sexy. Depending on your kink.

So how we’ve adapted. In regards to ball gags, they’re not as tight anymore. It may not fulfil the fantasy of being, like, gagged, but for practicality, the ball gags aren’t as tight. They’re a little loser than normal, which means that they can be popped out and I can actually hear what’s going on instead of mumblings and trying to figure out why [mumbles as an example] … yes. We all know what that means, don’t we?

If we use any kind of cuffs, they’re generally velcro and we must be able to undo them ourselves. Now, I always need help with that but the Gen [my partner] must always be able to undo his cuffs himself to get out just in case, uh, I have a bad body, and I don’t trust, you know, that I’m going to hear the doorbell, or what if something going off, or, you- be able to hear important instructions. I can’t really trust my hearing anymore, so we have to make sure we have these types of things in place. So, it’s just easier on everyone.

If I miss something, I point to my ear. This is something I picked up ages ago. I think we were out and I just kind of point to it. So instead of saying ‘what’ a bunch of times, I just point. You know, I can make it look really flippant, then it’s really not obvious, but there’s a lot of this [pointing to ear] going on generally. There’s a lot of this going on at home, when out, just because I’m trying to figure out if my hearings going in that ear, but it means that I’m not breaking the mood so much, and it also has a double kind of bonus, that if my jaw is playing up and I can’t really talk so much and it’s locked or it’s painful, I can get him to say something again without having had to say what. And, you know, hurting the jaw. Quite useful really.

If he’s blindfolded and he says something I don’t understand, then I double tap him. It signals that I have no clue what’s going on and I need some clarification, so then he can pop out the loosened ball gag and tell me without having to take the blindfold off, he knows what’s going on. Now we’ve comminuted on our own way.

We have also sworn off erotic whispers. They’re not that erotic when you are literally just like, “What? No. What? N- A little louder. The f- the fish. What do you mean about the fish?” and that has been one of our conversations. Something about a fish took me just to realize, no, it was nothing about a fish. It was supposed to be kinky. It wasn’t. It didn’t come across as kinky. So erotic whispers are a no go in our bedroom.

The last adaptation, shall we say, is music. Now, we pick music we both know. Music that I’m not going to be listening to and trying to figure out the lyrics. We pick music that we’re both fond of. We pick it because it helps us to relax, and it helps us to get out of our brains. I am very bad at being all in my head, not being very good at relaxing. Music helps that. It also is very good for my tinnitus. If I have some background noise going on I’m not as aware of my tinnitus as normal. Like in silence, right now when both of my ears are ringing. This one has like deep tones, and this one just like, constant beep. It’s quite something.

Let me know if there’s anything you’d like to see me cover next and I will see you the next time. Bye.


  • Self-professed 'Professional (Disabled) Internet Human' Ruby Rousson runs Arousibility, The Ruby Umbrella and a number of other sites that all aim to help disabled and chronically ill people in some way shape or form. Twitter and Instagram: @MissRubyRousson

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